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  Talking Crosswalks

Auditory pedestrian signals increased pedestrian observing behavior and reduce conflicts at a signalized intersection. Transportation Research Record, 1998, No. 1578, 20-22.


Abstract
An auditory pedestrian signal prompting pedestrians to look for turning vehicles at the start of the walk signal increased pedestrian observing behavior and almost eliminated pedestrian motor vehicle conflicts at a signalized intersection. The presence of the auditory message appeared to prime pedestrians to respond more rapidly to turning vehicles. The signal was judged to be very useful by visually impaired pedestrians because it indicated when they could walk and specified the street with the walk signal. Although this study was only conducted over a relatively brief period (1 month), the effects of similar intervention (signs prompting motorists to look for turning vehicles) have been shown to endure for at least a year.

 
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