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The use of feedback to increase observed daytime seat belt use in two cities in North Carolina. Accident Analysis and Prevention. 28, 1996, 771-777.

Abstract
Well publicized enforcement programs in North Carolina have raised seat belt use to about 80%. In an effort to find techniques to raise belt use further, signs providing feedback to drivers on belt use rates were introduced in two communities, Asheboro (population 18,000) and Greensboro (population 183,000). Feedback signs remind motorists about belt use and imply a constant and vigorous enforcement presence. The signs were prominently posted by the roadside at high volume locations; belt use information was changed weekly based on observational surveys. Observed daytime driver belt use in Asheboro increased from an average of 75% before the signs to 89% after the signs were established. At urban sites in Greensboro, driver belt use increased from 80% to 86%. Right front passenger belt use increased significantly in Asheboro but not in Greensboro. There were no changes in belt use at two interstate exit sites in Greensboro. Reasons for the differential success rates may relate to differences in initial belt use rates, community size, amount of publicity, and numbers of encounter with the signs. It is clear, however, that feedback signs can be an important supplement to belt use enforcement programs.

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